Watershed health is a gardener’s responsibility

Gardens can be both good and bad for watershed health. Photo: R. Emanuel.

Gardens can be both good and bad for watershed health. Photo: R. Emanuel.

Gardeners can have a huge impact on local watershed health. As hundreds, thousands and eventually millions of them influence the land use, inputs, water use and runoff patterns from their home landscapes, they shape the water quality of a watershed. Even little actions add up in a watershed.

Below are some resources I’ve drawn together for OSU Master Gardener trainings I’m delivering around the state this winter and spring. Hopefully others will find them useful too.

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/eco-gardening

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/pages/streamside-gardening

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/pages/gardening_natives.html

WaterWise Gardening Multimedia Presentation: http://bit.ly/8OsSTD

WaterWise ™ Gardening: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/waterwisetm-gardening/feed

Surfrider Foundation Ocean Friendly Gardens: http://www.surfrider.org/ofg.asp

Oregon Rain Garden Guide: http://seagrant.oregonstate.edu/sgpubs/onlinepubs.html

OSU Watershed Education Team: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/watershed/

Oregon Stormwater Solutions: http://www.oeconline.org/our-work/rivers/stormwater

Protecting Water from Non-point Source Pollution: http://protectingwater.com/

Puget Sound Partnership (non-point source pollution): http://www.psp.wa.gov/

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